RADIO FITS FOR RCN CRUISERS


 
NAME PENDANT LAUNCHED COMMISSIONED PAID OFF
Ontario  53 29 July 1943 25 May 1945 15 Oct 1958
Uganda 66 7 August 1941 21 Oct 1944 15 June 1956

HMCS ONTARIO was a Minotaur class light cruiser while Uganda was a  Crown Colony class light cruiser. Both ships first saw service with the Royal Navy before being transferred to the Royal Canadian Navy as shown in the commissioning dates. In UGANDA, two Supermarine Walrus (Photo courtesy Wikipedia) aircraft were  removed in November 1943 while the ship was still in service with the Royal Navy. By that time, radar had replaced the seaplane as a means or early detection.  By the time Minotaur/Ontario was built, the Minotaur class represented a substantial advance towards more sophisticated weapon control and integration of command and control and AIO functions  in support of operation room control of fighting ship and aircraft.

Once commissioned with the RCN, neither ship was fitted with an operational aircraft so the hangar in ONTARIO was eventually used as the practice room for the ship's band.  It was probably the same case for QUEBEC.

The data in the tables below was extracted from BR 299, a Royal Navy publication dated 1947.  Photos and specs for some of this equipment can be found in this document including the specs for all 60 series transmitters .  Any numeric suffixes which appear for American made equipment, denote the procurement contract number. A TBL-4 is identical to a TBL-12  but was made under a different contract number or even a different contractor. Note that Uganda has an additional compartment , namely Radio Telephone Office No. 2.  Each ship used a different designator for the transmitting rooms.

Both vessels spent most of their service lives as training ships.

HMCS ONTARIO (53)
LOCATION  EQUIPMENT 
Upper Transmitting Room  57DMR - Main HF transmitter.  3 to 20 MHz; CW/MCW/Voice. 3K out on CW; 800 watts out on MCW/Voice 
Photo here.  (Courtesy British Admiralty) 
59D -   MF transmitter; 100 to 500 KHz; CW/MCW;  Power out is 2 kw on CW and 500 watts on MCW. Photo here.(Courtesy British Admiralty)
60EQR -  Low power transmitter
60DR - Low power transmitter 
89P - A 250/350 watt, AM/CW transmitter which operated in the range of 2200 KHz to 20 MHz and patterned
          after the American  built, RCA type ET4336. 
4 x TA - 8 inch unipole trunking 
TC - An 18 inch aerial trunk used with high power transmitters. 
CAB - Receiver outfit. Consists of tuner/amplifiers A50 and B50. The A50 tunes 15 KHz to 600 KHz. while the B50 receives from 500 KHz to 23 MHz. Photo here(Courtesy Collingwood Heritage Museum) 
CBB - B19 receiver (part of 60 series transmitter) 
BBr - Battery outfit. 24 volts @220 amp/hours; 4 volts @ 110 amp/hours. 
1 x RIS - Radar Interference Supressor (filter) 
GJ -   wavemeter outfit; LF/MF/HF. 
Lower Transmitting Room  57DMR -  Main HF transmitter.  3 to 20 MHz; CW/MCW/Voice. 3K out on CW; 800 watts out on MCW/Voice 
Photo here.  (Courtesy British Admiralty) 
59D - MF transmitter; 100 to 500 KHz; CW/MCW;  Power out is 2 kw on CW and 500 watts on MCW. Photo here. (Courtesy British Admiralty) 
60DR -  Low power transmitter
CAB - Receiver outfit. Consists of tuner/amplifiers A50 and B50. The A50 tunes 15 KHz to 600 KHz. while the B50 receives from 500 KHz to 23 MHz. Photo here(Courtesy Collingwood Heritage Museum) 
GJ - wavemeter outfit; LF/MF/HF. 
2 x TA - An 8 inch unipole trunk for use with medium power transmitters. 
TC - 18 inch unipole trunking 
Lower Receiving Room  4 x CDC - B28 receiver
2 x CDF -  B29 receiver 
1 x RIS - Radar Interference Supressor (filter) 
EJ - Aerial Exchange Board. Maximum antennas unknown. 
GN -  Wavemeter outfit. Wavemeter G73 with oscillator G42. Frequency range  100 KHz to 25 MHz  Photo here
GR - Wavemeter outfit. GR is Royal Navy version of the RAF Crystal Monitor 2. 
KDC - Remote controller for R/T set 
Briefing and Ready Room 
(for pilot briefings)
60EQR transmitter
CBB- B19 Receiver ( part of 60 series transmitter) 
6 x CDC - B29 Receiver 
CDU - VHF receiver. 100 to 150 MHz; Photo here
TF - A 4 inch aerial trunk for use with type TV5, TCS or HT 11 transmitters. 
BBq - Battery outfit. 24 volts@ 220 amp/hours; 4 volts @110 amp/hours
GN - Wavemeter outfit , crystal type. Frequency range  100 KHz to 25 MHz. 
GR - Wavemeter outfit. GR is Royal Navy version of the RAF Crystal Monitor 2. 
Radio/Telephone  Office 87M - Radio set. Frequency range: 100 to 145 MHz . Mode: A3. Power output: 50 W.
86M - British version of SCR-522
6 x TBS- VHF Transmitter/Receiver 60 to 80 MHz
Aircraft Direction Room  CDC - B28 receiver
3 x RIS - Radar Interference Supressor (filter) 
KFD - R/T control system fitted in ships for fighter direction.  KFD allowed 6 channels with 3 controlling positions.
KGA/2 - Controller for R/T equipment
D/F Office FM12 - MF/DF outfit.  42 to 1060 KHz. Photo here.
1 x RIS - Radar Interference Supressor (filter) 
Chart House DAS2 - Loran 'A' receiver
Aerial Outfits AOA - Wire aerial. No specific type. 
2 x APH - Aerial for 86M set
APU -  Unknown use
AWA - MF/HF aerial 
Miscellaneous. 52ER -  Transportable set . 150 to 1500 KHz
Type 53 - Manpack radio 3 to 6 MHz 
2 x Type 67 - WS67 (AP W3217) is the Royal Navy version of the British Army WS27 set.  Photo here. (Courtesy British Admiralty)
611 - Portable , self contained emergency transmitter for use in lifeboats. CW or MCW on 500 KHz only. Range of 100 miles. Photo here. (Courtesy British Admiralty) 
OF - Deck  insulator for DAS Loran receiver 

 
HMCS UGANDA (66)
LOCATION  EQUIPMENT 
Transmitting Room 
No. 1 
57DMR- Main HF transmitter.  3 to 20 MHz; CW/MCW/Voice. 3K out on CW; 800 watts out on MCW/Voice .Photo here.(Courtesy British Admiralty) 
59D - MF transmitter; 100 to 500 KHz; CW/MCW;  Power out is 2 kw on CW and 500 watts on MCW. Photo here. (Courtesy British Admiralty) 
60D - Low power transmitter
TBS - VHF Transmitter/Receiver; 60 to 80 MHz
TCS - Radio set. 1500 – 12,000 KC range in 3 bands.   Photo here. (Courtesy N6CC) 
CAB - Receiver outfit. Consists of tuner/amplifiers A50 and B50. The A50 tunes 15 KHz to 600 KHz. while the B50 receives from 500 KHz to 23 MHz. Photo here(Courtesy Collingwood Heritage Museum) 
GJ - Wavemeter outfit. Photo here. 
2 x TA -  An 8 inch unipole trunk for use with medium power transmitters. 
TC -   An 18 inch aerial trunk used with high power transmitters. 
Transmitting Room
No. 2
57DMR - Main HF transmitter.  3 to 20 MHz; CW/MCW/Voice. 3K out on CW; 800 watts out on MCW/Voice Photo here. (Courtesy British Admiralty) 
59D - MF transmitter; 100 to 500 KHz; CW/MCW;  Power out is 2 kw on CW and 500 watts on MCW. Photo here. (Courtesy British Admiralty) 
60D -Low power transmitter
CAB - Receiver outfit. Consists of tuner/amplifiers A50 and B50. The A50 tunes 15 KHz to 600 KHz. while the B50 receives from 500 KHz to 23 MHz. Photo here(Courtesy Collingwood Heritage Museum) 
GJ - Wavemeter Outfit. Photo here. (Courtesy British Admiralty)
1 x TS An 8 inch unipole trunk for use with medium power transmitters. 
TC - An 18 inch aerial trunk used with high power transmitters. 
Lower Receiving Room CAB - Receiver outfit. Consists of tuner/amplifiers A50 and B50. The A50 tunes 15 KHz to 600 KHz. while the B50 receives from 500 KHz to 23 MHz. Photo here(Courtesy Collingwood Heritage Museum) 
2 x CBB - B19 part of 60 series transmitter 
2 x CDC - B29 Receiver 
2 x RBJ - National Receiver;  50 to 400 kHz and  480 kHz to 30 MHz. Photo here.   (Photo by Denis Chouinard  VE2DSH) )
1 x RIS -  Radar interference supressor (filter) 
EF - Aerial exchange outfit.
GN - Wavemeter outfit , crystal type. Frequency range  100 KHz to 25 MHz. Photo here  (Photo courtesy British Admiralty)
Briefing and Ready Room 
(for pilot briefings)
60ER - Low power HF transmitter
TCS - Radio set. 1500 – 12,000 KC range in 3 bands.   Photo here. (Courtesy N6CC) 
CBA - Receiver outfit. 
5 x CDC - B28 receiver
RBJ - National Receiver;  50 to 400 kHz and  480 kHz to 30 MHz. Photo here.   (Photo by Denis Chouinard  VE2DSH)
FM7- MFDF outfit 42 to 1000 KHz . Photo here
3 x RIS- Radar interference supressor (filter) 
EF - Aerial exchange board for 10 aerials
GN - Wavemeter outfit , crystal type. Frequency range  100 KHz to 25 MHz.
Radio/Telephone  Office
No.1 
86M - British version of American SCR-522
87M - VHF transmitter/receiver; MCW/Phone; 100 to 146 Mhz; 50 watts Photo here. (Courtesy British Admiralty) 
5 x TBS - VHF radio set ; 60 to 80 MHz. 50 watts
Radio/Telephone  Office
No. 2
89M - 250/350 watt, AM/CW transmitter which operated in the range of 2200 KHz to 20 MHz and patterned after the American-built, RCA type ET-4336. 
Aircraft Direction Room 
(Note 1) 
SCR-608 (Note #2) Mobile radio set; 20  to 27 MHz;  FM
AN/ARC/1 (Note #3) 1 Frequency range: 100 to 156 MHz  Mode: A3. Power output: 8 w . Photo here(Photo by Richard Pekelney)
CDC - B28 receiver 
P38  - VHF receiver 100 to 150 MHz  Photo here.  (Courtesy British Admiralty) 
KFD - Fighter Direction Control Outfit. 
D/F Office FM7 - MFDF outfit 42 to 1000 KHz  . Photo here.  (Courtesy Brisish Admiralty) 
Chart House DAS2 - Loran 'A' receiver
Aerial Outfits AOA - Use unknown 
3 x APH-  Aerial for 86M set
2 x APU - Aerial for 86M set.
Miscellaneous. 52ERT-  Transportable set; 150 to 1500 KHz. 
TYpe 53 - Manpack radio 3 to 6 MHz
2 x Type 67 - WS67 (AP W3217) is the Royal Navy version of the British Army WS27 set. 
OF-  Deck  insulator for DAS Loran receiver 
NOTES:

#1 -  This room could be used to track all aircraft, friend and foe alike.

#2 - So what's an SCR-608 doing aboard Uganda since this is a mobile set made for the US Army? One application for this radio was to to report the fall of shot back to the ship's gunners during a bombardment.   As part of Uganda’s WWII operations, she was dispatched to the Pacific in January 1944 and in June of that year, she participated in the bombardment of Truk Island with US Forces.  This would be the most plausible use for the SCR-608. After WWII ended the radio way probably left in the Aircraft Direction Room.

#3 - The ARC-1 would be used to communicate with aircraft.


Contributors and Credits:

1) Clive Kidd, Collingwood Heritage Museum <cjckidd(at)waitrose.com>
2) BR299  dated 1947, Royal Navy
3) http://www.rnmuseumradarandcommunications2006.org.uk/Transmitters%20Late%201920%20to%20Early%201950.pdf
4) Wavemeters http://www.rnmuseumradarandcommunications2006.org.uk/WAVEMETERS%20ETC%201938.pdf
6)  KC series  http://www.rnmuseumradarandcommunications2006.org.uk/THE_KC_AND_KF_CONTROL_SYSTEMS.html
7) Darren Scannell <hawkone(at)hawk-graphics.com>
8) David Freeman <djfreeman(at)shaw.ca>
9) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minotaur-class_cruiser_(1943)
10) Type 57 http://www.rnmuseumradarandcommunications2006.org.uk/57.pdf
11) CDU receiver http://www.rnmuseumradarandcommunications2006.org.uk/CDU%20P104.pdf
12) Dave Shirlaw <djshirlaw(at)shaw.ca>
13) TCS radio http://www.n6cc.com/tcs-radio-set
14) M651, Nomenclature of Radio Equipment September 1944 at amendment 6 3/1/49. The book was produced and distributed by Admiralty Signals Establishment
15) http://www.rnmuseumradarandcommunications2006.org.uk/B50.pdf
16) Receivers http://www.rnmuseumradarandcommunications2006.org.uk/Receivers%20Late%201920%20to%20Early%201950.pdf
 
 
 

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Oct 19/16